Thursday, November 14, 2013

Outpouring of love from all over the world

I grew up studying in international schools as a child and that experience opened my mind to the thought that regardless of race, color, gender, religion or geographic region, we can co-exist in this planet. Yes, we may have issues over trivial things but, despite that, we're also out there for each other. If there's a ray of hope amidst the catastrophe that was brought about by super typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, it's the knowledge that at the end of the day, we break borders and barriers to reach out to our brothers and sisters in dire need.

Aside from getting billions worth of aid from international organizations, private companies, the Queen mother herself, what truly is inspiring is how regular joes and janes come together to do their part, no matter how small it is.

Thank you. The Filipinos will never forget.

Europe 
In Europe, there's an on-going petition to donate the 12M Euro that was not won at the national lottery to rehabilitating the lives of the victims of Yolanda. Link: http://chn.ge/1aVCJqx


Finland
There's a man who stood at the Finnish countryside to solicit funds for the Red Cross. According to him, almost everyone who passed by made a donation.


US
Aside from the wonderful young ladies who sold lemonades in L.A., Brad Dubs utilized his company, www.causes.com to generate awareness and raise funds for the typhoon victims. Link: http://bit.ly/1bqRa0L


I'm sharing the photo of the two kids selling lemonades again because it just warms my heart.


Middle East
A girl from the Middle East named Lana, asked how much one Riyal is when converted to Pesos. When she found out that a few Riyals can feed a lot of mouths, she decided to donate her pocket money to the 'children crying on television'.


Japan
A 6 year old pre-schooler in Japan did not hesitate to donate his childhood savings to the victims of super typhoon Yolanda after seeing how it has affected the people in the Philippines. Accompanied by his mother, he visited the Philippine Embassy in Tokyo to turnover his donation of Y5,000, making him the Embassy's youngest donor.



Shoichi Kondoh handing over his donation to the Philippine Embassy. Photo lifted from http://bit.ly/1e5t67v

Philippines
It's always amazing to see the nation unite together for a common cause. There are a lot of fundraising events being organized by individuals, corporations and organizations right now. However, this is my favorite story that I lifted from Facebook user, Mayette Cinco.

Bigas, Sardinas at Trenta Pesos (Rice, Sardines and Thirty Pesos)
The boys and I decided to drop by the grocery after church this afternoon to buy the stuff we would be sending to Tacloban City tomorrow. Nearing our house, we saw five Tawi kids waiting for us at the gate. (Note: These are kids who scavenge for items in trash bins to recycle in exchange for money that they can buy food with for their every day survival.)

With a smile, they greeted us and handed me a small paper bag and said, 'Pakisama nyo po to sa ipapadala nyo bukas sa mga binagyo. Nangalakal kami para sa kanila. Sana po makatulong.' (Translation: Please include these in the items that you will be donating tomorrow. We scavenged the streets for items to recycle for them). I opened the bag and saw a kilo of rice, 2 sardines and three ten peso coins. 'Yung trenta po, pambili nila duon ng tinapay para hindi mayupi sa biyahe.' (Translation: The thirty pesos is for them to buy bread there. We don't want to give them bread that's squished from the long journey from here to Tacloban). I held the precious bag so tight and assured the boys that their donation will surely help kids in Tacloban. I know how hard they worked today just so they can share. It's not easy being chased by dogs & cops and be bullied by all sorts of 'tambays' in the streets (Note: Tambays are people who have nothing better to do than hang out in the streets of Manila.) Not easy to walk the entire day looking for scraps in every street garbage drums. But, they braved the heat of the sun and all other challenges just to come up with what they think would be of help to others. I said to myself, 'Nahihiya ako sa kanila. Hindi ako naaawa, hamahanga ako kasi hindi lahat kayang magbigay ng may kalakip na sakripisyo.' (Translation: I am embarrassed. I don't feel any pity for them. I actually salute them because not everyone sacrifices in order to help others). So often we give from our spare but these kids, gave out of the only things that they've got. Reminds me of the poor widow who gave 2 pennies for the Lord. She game her all for the Master and that made the difference. God bless, beautiful children of the Savior.


Photo of a kid in the Philippines who recycle in exchange for money. This image is just used to support the story above. Not actual image of one of the boys. Lifted from http://bit.ly/1aGtlkv
My faith in humanity has been restored greatly. Notice how the kids of today willingly offered what they have (Majority of them offered ALL that they have!) to help? It gives us so much hope. Our world is in great hands after all.

Still think that you're too small to make a big difference, think again!
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